52 Weeks of Printmakers: Veronica Corzo-Duchardt

Photograph by Anjali Pinto

Veronica Corzo-Duchardt is a Cuban-American artist, designer, and printmaker based in Philadelphia. Fascinated by traces of history embedded in the objects we use, collect and leave behind, her practice is rooted in memory, heritage, and material culture. She creates screenprints that are both textured and minimal, and has collaborated with companies such as CB2 and Addidas. You can see more of her work on Instagram and her website.

When kids say that they want to be artists, most grownups assume that they want to become painters or illustrators (or, occasionally, sculptors) – but never printmakers. How did you find your way into this medium? What other media do you work in?

I found my way to printmaking while in grad school. It seemed like a very tactile way to get my ideas across in a language I already understood from working as a graphic designer. I loved both the sense of play and precision in printmaking. That and I loved getting off the computer and getting my hands dirty.

How would you describe your work?

My work is abstract, textural and minimal. It engages with cultural identity, memory, and history contained within the everyday objects and materials that surround us.

What’s the first thing you ever remember making?

I screenprinted the back of two photographs of my great grandparents. I loved seeing the marks of time and their handwriting translated to ink on paper. 

You are both a fine artist and a designer. How do both practices influence each other?

My fine art practice and is always informing my design practice and vs. versa. My design work is very expressive and I think my printmaking has a graphic sensibility.

What are you currently working on, and why?

I’m working on a new body of work right. Which I’m super excited about. These pieces are original works on paper created with coffee grounds, spray paint and screenprint. I’ve been using sugar and coffee as materials in my work for a few years as a way to engage with my Cuban identity and my relationship with Cuba. This new work brings together a lot of the ideas I’ve been investigating for a while.

Do you have a dream project (or two)?

I’d love to work with a hotel to create the artwork for their interiors.  I’m really excited by the idea of creating a sense of place that’s both familiar yet a bit strange. I think a hotel is a perfect playground for that. Everything from in-room original works, wallpaper, and textiles.

What’s next?

I’m planning on pushing this body of work further not just through prints, but I’m interested in incorporating sounds as part of the sensory experience as well. I’m taking a Sounds Ethnographies workshop at Union Docs in Brooklyn at the end of the month and I’m really excited to see where that takes the work.

So my next goal is to exhibit this work in a way that incorporates prints, objects, photography, and sound. 

What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out?

Keep practicing, the more you print the better you will get. It sounds like simple advice but I do think that you can only get good at something by continuing to push through it. 

What do you want readers to know about you or your work?

It really does look better in person. I know every artist says that but I’m a sucker for the subtlety in colors and how I overlay textures, unfortunately, that doesn’t always translate on screen in the best way.  

How can people find you? (website, shop, Instagram, Facebook page, Twitter, etc.)

Instagram: @winterbureau   (Where you will find my most updated work!)

Twitter @winterbureau

Websites: winterbureau.com and veronicacorzoduchardt.com

Weedwatching

My show, Weedwatching, opens at Mule Gallery on July 7th, with a reception from 6-9 pm that day. Please stop by!

Mule Gallery80 Fresno StreetSan Francisco

The show will run until August 25th.

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Some Spring 2017 Design, Carve, Print work

Two-color print by Annemiek Mion

Two-color print by Yolanda Gonzalez

I have been meaning to write this post forever. Well, not forever – since April (it’s June now). Since the next session of Design, Carve, Print is about to begin, I figured it was finally time to share some work from the last session. So, today I present the work of Yolanda Gonzalez and Annemiek Mion.

 

Yolanda Gonzalez

Yolanda Gonzalez is an illustrator, photographer and designer based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. You can see more of her work here and here.

 

Annemiek Mion

Annemiek Mion is an Amsterdam-based printmaker who screenprints on leather, creating purses, wallets and pouches. See more of her work here and here.

 

I’m looking forward to the next session of Design, Carve, Print, which begins this weekend. There is still time to sign up. More information and registration are here.

 

52 Weeks of Printmakers: Amos Kennedy Jr.

I met Amos Kennedy Jr. at the opening of his show at Mule Gallery a couple of weeks ago. A self-described “humble negro printer,” Kennedy  is currently turning a 3000 sq ft Detroit warehouse (that, at the moment, only has 1500 sq ft of roof) into a print shop and center for the study of letterpress print. Read on! And if you’re in the Bay Area, see his show before it closes at the end of June!

When kids say that they want to be artists, most grownups assume that they want to become painters or illustrators (or, occasionally, sculptors) – but never printmakers. How did you find your way into this medium? What other media do you work in?

Well, I am a printer not a printmaker. People like to call me a printmaker. But I consider myself a commercial printer. But in reality, I just put ink on paper. I really enjoy the process. Oh, I have been know to bind a book or two, make collages, blow a little glass, play with cloth but I spend a lot of time defying the social norms of this civilization.

How would you describe your work?

Messy. Lacking the skills of fine printing. A true reflection of my life.

You describe yourself as a “humble negro printer”. Why?

Because to be humble does not mean you are unaware of your humility. Have you seen me? I tell people that I am “negro” because most people mistake me for africanamerican. There is a profound difference between “negro” and africanamerican. My ancestors were the enslaved peoples whose labor built the wealth of this civilization.

What’s the first thing you ever remember making?

In elementary school, I would fold paper and make what I called “books”.

Is there a ritual or activity that is crucial to your practice?

Each day I am in my space, I MUST put ink on paper. Why else go to the space? Problem solving happens at the press for me. I enjoy being in the moment.

What are you currently working on, and why?

I am taking a 3,000 sq ft building with a 1,500 sq ft roof and converting it into a print shop. See the answer to question #8.

Do you have a dream project (or two)?

1) To organize the wood type collection I have and create a catalog of it.

2) Create installations of display in public libraries across the nation.

What’s next?

To build a space for the advance study of the design and production of letterpress printed posters. While more and more people want to design and print poster using the letterpress process, there are few places in theseunitestatesofamerica that allow them to pursue that goal. For the past twenty years I have collected several printing presses and a collection of wood type. Now, I have rebuilding an old auto repair garage in Detroit to house the equipment, so people can come and develop the craft of poster design.

What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out?

It is the doing that matters. Lose yourself in the process to find yourself. Keep your exceptions low so you can meet them. As you become experienced in the craft, your projects will reflect that growth.

What do you want readers to know about you or your work?

If I knew what I was doing, I won’t do it. I live in the moment. Generosity is what makes us human, Be generous. I am transformed by the work I do more than the work is transformed by me. Make stuff!!! Do not worry about the quality of what you make. Make stuff.

How can people find you?

My Internet presence is kennedyprints. I keep it simple so I can remember it.